Drug and Alcohol Treatment Resources in Washington, DC

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Substance abuse treatment in Washington, DC includes services provided in a host of different settings, all of which can be accessed for information on the recovery process. Such settings include private rehab centers, public rehab centers, hospitals, detoxification centers, halfway houses (in some areas), doctors’ offices (typically limited to opioid replacement therapy maintenance), and methadone facilities. No two people follow the exact same path to a recovery service provider.

Many professionals and services are available to guide and support the addiction recovery process; it’s often just a matter of finding them. DC Substance abuse programs include numerous services on the public, private, and nonprofit level in Washington, DC, to get the recovery process started.

Alcohol and Drug Treatment Centers in Washington, DC

There are multiple strategies for treating addiction and substance misuse, and one of the following options may be what helps put you on the path toward sobriety.1-3

  • Detox programs involve the clearing of drugs from the body. Medically managed withdrawal may be involved in order to address the unpleasant and potentially dangerous side effects that may occur depending on the abused drug. Detox does not address the deeper issues connected to addiction and so should only be treated as the first step on the road toward recovery.
  • Residential (inpatient) rehab sets a patient up in a stable environment where they can receive care and have a specialized treatment plan in structured environment. Extended care is provided in a facility with numerous intensive services available 24 hours a day. There are both short-term and long-term residential treatment options, which can be beneficial for those with more severe problems, including co-occurring disorders.
  • Partial hospitalization programs provide outpatient addiction treatment services including therapy and access to medical care. Patients attend the program at least 5 days a week for 4-6 hours a day while living at home. These programs are best for those who have severe substance use disorders and do not need 24-hour supervision but still need a high level of support.
  • Outpatient treatment programs can vary in intensity and types of services provided. They are less expensive than residential or inpatient treatment and are usually more suited for those with extensive support at home. Most involve individual and/or therapy.

 There are many choices for treatment in Washington, DC, so it is vital to review all options and find both the most appropriate form of treatment as well as the right facility for you and your needs.

Recovery Meetings Near Me in Washington, DC

Ensuring that you remain in recovery from a substance abuse disorder requires continued work and support. Beyond detox and rehabilitation treatment, there are support groups that can help you overcome temptation, develop strategies for coping, and find success in continued sobriety.

Alcoholics Anonymous Meetings in Washington, DC

Alcoholics Anonymous (AA) is a group of people supporting one another with the sharing of their experiences, commitment, and hope to manage their shared problem. There is no requirement for membership except the desire to stop drinking. AA has no religious or political affiliation and functions largely based on its Twelve Steps.4

There are various meetings available in Washington, DC, including the following.

  • Federal City Shelter: 425 2nd Street Northwest, Washington, DC, 20001
  • Dumbarton United Methodist Church: 3133 Dumbarton Street Northwest, Washington, DC, 20007
  • Dupont Circle Club: 1623 Connecticut Avenue Northwest, Washington, DC, 20009
  • Metropolis Club: 938 Rhode Island Avenue Northeast, Washington, DC, 20018
  • Triangle Club: 2030 P Street Northwest, Washington, DC, 20036
  • Calvary Baptist Church: 755 8th Street Northwest, Washington, DC, 20001
  • 1221 M Street: 1221 M Street Northwest, Washington, DC, 20005
  • Saint Mary Mother of God: 727 5th Street Northwest, Washington, DC, 20001
  • Elizabeth’s Hospital: 1100 Alabama Avenue Southeast, Washington, DC, 20032
  • Augustine’s: 555 Water Street Southwest, Washington, DC, 20024
  • Paul’s Christian: 414 Tennessee Avenue Northeast, Washington, DC, 20002
  • Foundry Methodist Church: 1500 16th Street Northwest, Washington, DC, 20036
  • Paul’s Lutheran Church: 4900 Connecticut Avenue Northwest, Washington, DC, 20008
  • Baptist Church: 901 Rittenhouse Street Northwest, Washington, DC, 20011
  • Metropolitan AME Church: 1518 M Street Northwest, Washington, DC, 20005
  • Takoma Baptist Church: 635 Aspen Street Northwest, Washington, DC, 20012
  • Takoma Park SDA Church: 6810 Eastern Avenue, Washington, DC, 20012
  • Westside Club: 1341 Wisconsin Avenue Northwest, Washington, DC, 20007
  • Festival Center: 1640 Columbia Road Northwest, Washington, DC, 20009
  • Randall United Methodist Church: 1002 46th Street Northeast, Washington, DC, 20019
  • Alban’s Church: 3001 Wisconsin Avenue Northwest, Washington, DC, 20016
  • Central Group Location: 67 Kennedy Street Northwest, Washington, DC, 20011
  • *SPANISH* 3115 Georgia Avenue Northwest, Washington, DC, 20010
  • *SPANISH* Lamont Street Northwest, Washington, DC, 20010
  • *SPANISH* 2029 Rhode Island Avenue Northeast, Washington, DC, 20018
  • *SPANISH* 4027 13th Street Northwest, Washington, DC, 20011
  • *SPANISH* Renacer Hispano: 1772 Columbia Road Northwest, Washington, DC, 20009
  • *SPANISH* Seis de Septiembre: 3819 10th Street Northwest, Washington, DC, 20011

Narcotics Anonymous (NA) Meetings in Washington, DC

Narcotics Anonymous (NA) is a community-based organization with members from across the globe. It is a group of people who have a problem with drugs and are recovering addicts who are working to stay clean and help others work toward sobriety as well. The only requirement for membership is the desire to no longer use.5

Meetings in Washington, DC, include the following.

  • Church of the Epiphany: 1317 G Street Northwest, Washington, DC, 20005
  • Veterans Administration Medical Center: 50 Irving Street Northwest, Washington, DC, 20422
  • The View Apartment: 635 Edgewood Street Northeast (9th Floor), Washington, DC, 20017
  • Howard University Hospital: 2041 Georgia Avenue Northwest, Washington, DC, 20001
  • Dupont Circle Club: 1623 Connecticut Avenue Northwest, Washington, DC, 20009
  • Community for Creative Non-Violence: 425 2nd Street Northwest (2nd Floor), Washington, DC, 20001
  • Luther Place Memorial: 1226 Vermont Avenue Northwest, Washington, DC, 20009
  • Varick Memorial AME Zion Church: 255 Anacostia Avenue Northeast, Washington, DC, 20019
  • Zion Baptist Church: 2101 14th Street Northwest, Washington, DC, 20011
  • Capitol Hill UMC: 421 Seward Square Southeast, Washington, DC, 20003
  • Mary’s Church: 727 5th Street Northwest (Church Hall), Washington, DC, 20001
  • First Trinity Lutheran Church: 501 4th Street Northwest (2nd Floor Library), Washington, DC, 20001
  • Martin’s Church: 1912 North Capitol Street Northwest, Washington, DC, 20002
  • Church of the First Born: 2451 Ainger Place Southeast, Washington, DC, 20020
  • Emmanuel Baptist Church: 2049 Ainger Place Southeast, Washington, DC, 20020
  • Moriah Baptist Church: 1636 East Capitol Street Northeast, Washington, DC, 20003
  • Walker Memorial Baptist Church: 2020 13th Street Northwest, Washington, DC, 20009
  • The Summit at St. Martin’s Apartments: 116 T Street Northeast, Washington, DC, 20002
  • Temple of Praise Church: 700 Southern Avenue Southeast, Washington, DC, 20032
  • Columba’s Episcopal Church: 4201 Albermarle Street Northwest (Room 206), Washington, DC, 20016
  • 55 Water Street Southwest (2nd Floor), Washington, DC, 20024
  • 717 5th Street Northwest, Washington, DC, 20001
  • House of Praise Church: 5110 Nannie Helen Burroughs Avenue Northeast, Washington, DC, 20019
  • 152 Wayne Place Southeast, Washington, DC, 20032
  • Plymouth Congregational Church: 5301 North Capitol Street Northeast, Washington, DC, 20011
  • The Harold J. Gordon Building: 124 15th Street Southeast, Washington, DC, 20002
  • Clean and Sober Street: 425 2nd Street Northwest, Washington, DC, 20001
  • Luke’s UMC: 3655 Calvert Street Northwest, Washington, DC, 20007

SMART Recovery Meetings in Washington, DC

Self-Management AND Recovery Training (SMART) is a community made up of mutual-support groups with a science-based approach to overcoming addiction. The program focuses on self-empowerment and self-reliance and involves both face-to-face and online meetings. SMART Recovery provides practical tools and social supports to help members work toward long-term recovery.6

SMART Recovery meeting sites include the following.

  • 1328 16th Street Northwest, Washington, DC, 20036
  • 1500 16th Street Northwest, Washington, DC, 20036
  • 1411 K Street Northwest, Washington, DC, 20005
  • 1313 New York Avenue Northwest, Washington, DC, 20005
  • 2100 New Hampshire Avenue Northwest, Washington, DC, 20009
  • 1 Chevy Chase Circle, Washington, DC, 20015

Al-Anon and Nar-Anon Meetings in Washington, DC

Al-Anon and Nar-Anon are support groups for people whose lives have been impacted by a loved one’s addiction. These programs allow for the sharing of common experiences and provide principles/steps that will help the families and friends of substance abusers make positive changes in their own lives, even if the substances abuser does not admit they have a problem.7,8

Find meetings for Al-Anon here. Find meetings for Nar-Anon here.

Prevalence of Drug Abuse in Washington, DC

According to the National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA), in Washington, DC in 2017, there were 244 overdose deaths that involved opioids—34.7 deaths per 100,000 people versus that national rate of 14.6 deaths per 100,000.9

In 2019, a study revealed that Washington, DC ranks number 1 for drug use and addiction.10 Additional statistics from the study include the following. Washington, DC ranks:10

  • 4th for highest percentage of teenage drug users.
  • 2nd for highest percentage of adult drug users.
  • 1st for highest percentage of adults with unmet drug-treatment needs.
  • 2nd for fewest substance abuse treatment facilities per 100,000 drug users.

According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, in 2017, there were 44 drug overdose deaths per 100,000 people in Washington, DC.11

In 2018, 67,367 people died from drug overdose, with 207 deaths per 100,00 people. Of those 67,367 people, 254 deaths were in the District of Columbia, with 35.4 per 100,000.12

Sources

  1. National Institute on Drug Abuse. (2018). Principles of Drug Addiction Treatment: A Research-Based Guide (Third Edition): Types of Treatment Programs.
  2. National Institute on Drug Abuse. (2019). DrugFacts: Treatment Approaches for Drug Addiction.
  3. National Institute on Drug Abuse. (2014). Principles of Adolescent Substance Use Disorder Treatment: A Research-Based Guide: Treatment Settings.
  4. Alcoholics Anonymous World Services, Inc. (2017). This is A.A.: An Introduction to the A.A. Recovery Program.
  5. Narcotics Anonymous World Services, Inc. (1986). Who, What, How and Why.
  6. Self-Management and Recovery Training (SMART Recovery). (n.d.). About SMART Recovery.
  7. Al-Anon Family Groups. (n.d.). What Is Al-Anon and Alateen?
  8. Nar-Anon Family Groups. (n.d.). What’s Nar-Anon?
  9. National Institute on Drug Abuse. (2019). Washington D.C. Opioid Summary.
  10. Kiernan, J.S. (2019). Drug Use by State: 2019’s Problem Areas.
  11. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. (2017). Drug Overdose Deaths.
  12. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, (2019). National Center for Health Statistics: Mortality in the United States 2018.
About The Contributor
Editorial Staff
Editorial Staff, American Addiction Centers
The editorial staff of Sunrise House is comprised of addiction content experts from American Addiction Centers. Our editors and medical reviewers have over a decade of cumulative experience in medical content editing and have reviewed thousands... Read More